Y todas las noches bajo la vía láctea parecen eternas

Hola, soy Rick. I'm 25 years old. I live in Puerto Rico. I probably totally like you.

Ask/tell me whatever!

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Tags: donald glover childish gambino the powerpuff girls
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(Source: gifystuff)

Tags: gwendoline christie brienne of tarth game of thrones
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reblogged via downlookingup
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I just hope that in the future more shows make use of the ”increasingly self-aware dude-bro” trope. Because it is the best and most beautiful thing ever.

Tags: the mindy project think like a peter screencaps
123 notes
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tapiocanaif:

taekwonjew:

Quite possibly my favorite xkcd ever

Nerds

I… was just watching Hackers like an hour ago and this pops up. How unlikely is that?

tapiocanaif:

taekwonjew:

Quite possibly my favorite xkcd ever

Nerds

I… was just watching Hackers like an hour ago and this pops up. How unlikely is that?

(Source: xkcd.com)

Tags: coincidencias cósmicas coincidencias nerdicas hackers featuring jonny lee miller's muppet face comics xkcd
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reblogged via tapiocanaif
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More Behind the Scenes of Mad Men courtesy of Christina Hendricks & Elisabeth Moss 

How beautiful.

(Source: tvguide.com)

Tags: mad men serious actors
3,032 notes
reblogged via suicideblonde
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wired:

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]


They don’t make kid’s shows like they used to — not only in regards to actual content, but also in reference to the diversity of the casting.
Those were the days.

wired:

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

They don’t make kid’s shows like they used to — not only in regards to actual content, but also in reference to the diversity of the casting.

Those were the days.

Tags: nickolodeon all that when you were young
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reblogged via wired
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Christina Hendricks for Net-A-Porter’s the edit, photographed by Yalena Yemchuk.

(Source: missavagardner)

Tags: mrrrrrrr christina hendricks
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reblogged via suicideblonde
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People don’t like her because it’s the making of her, right now. When she, sometime soon in the future, becomes this person that she’s been kind of building up to, for the past three seasons, now four, then people will really begin to root for her. I think even the audience doesn’t realize she’s such a dark horse. If she acted badass and tried to kill everyone there, she would be dead by now! She’s so intelligent, and I can’t stress that enough. Courtesy is a lady’s armor. She’s using her courtesy to deceive people, and she’s using her former self as a facade, and it works so much to her advantage, because people still think she’s this naive, vulnerable, little girl, and she’s really not. She knows exactly what she’s doing. She knows what game she’s playing! And no one else does. And she’s learned from the best — Cersei, Margaery, Tyrion, Littlefinger, even Joffrey. She’s learned so much from these people, and they don’t even realize it. They’re unwittingly feeding her to become this great kind of manipulator. King’s Landing can either make or break a person, and in Sansa’s case, it’s making her.
Tags: also have no time for people who hate sansa stark or peter campbell or betty francis quotes sophie turner
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reblogged via kerdea
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I have no time for people who hate Kanye for being an arrogant sort of dude. As if being arrogant suddenly invalidates everything else about a person.

I mean, goodness knows the guy’s not perfect, but the people who dismiss him simply because he’s not a humble dude should just really take a good, long — totally long — look at themselves.

(Source: michaelcorleone)

Tags: kanye west
86,393 notes
reblogged via coldmountainway
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ricktimus asked: "Fishing counts as partying." "Accusing Hannibal Lecter of being the Chesapeake Ripper counts as partying." "Therapy sessions with a cannibalistic serial killer count as parties."

kerdea:

"Brooding about growing antlers out of my head counts as partying."

"Thinking about how many people I’ve probably eaten counts as partying."

"Secretly plotting to kidnap Applesauce counts as partying."

Joking about Hannibal counts as partying.

Tags: kerdea love forever hannibal
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reblogged via kerdea